Model UN Supports the Development of Globally Minded Citizens

On January 30th, Boulder Country Day middle school students participated in the annual Model United Nations exercise. In teams, students represented a member country by researching it, writing resolutions on current issues it faces, and defending those resolutions at a gathering called the MUN General Assembly. Through this process, students learned about international relations, developed empathy, and gained a better understanding of how issues across the world affect us all. As an authorized IB Middle Years Program (MYP), BCD uses this curricular enhancement to support the IB goal of developing globally minded students. 

“It helps you to be more aware of the world around you so that you know more than just what’s happening the U.S.­­ ­- you know about the entire world. It also teaches you that history effects everything and it’s not just something you learn because you have to.

            – BCD 8th grader

More on BCD’s Middle School

More on the IB program

Perspectacles – A Critical Lens for Distance Learning

Earlier this week I went to the grocery store near my home. The isles had shifted to one-way traffic patterns and the floor was marked with red arrows and landing pads indicating where I could and could not stand. At the cashier, the woman standing in front of me was complaining openly about the situation, her inconvenience and general dissatisfaction. As I listened, I realized that I was feeling similar emotions… Why were the Cheerios I wanted not in stock??

Reflecting back at home, I realized I needed “perspectacles.” The Urban Dictionary defines perspectacles as a magical glass that somehow gives you the power of perspective. It is also a movement that has been used in schools and other organizations around the country to talk about empathy, perspective, leadership, and compassion.

A few years ago, I tuned in to the writing of Glennon Doyle and her often viral blogposts. In 2014, Glennon wrote a post about her gratitude for everyday things in her home. With COVID-19 as a reality check, Glennon as my inspiration, and perspectacles on, I share with you some of the things for which I am grateful.

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I have pantry shelves that are stocked with food. It’s like a mini-market – in my house.

I have toilet paper. Think about that… Paper that we – flush – down toilets. Granted, my household supply is limited, and we are rationing squares, but I live in a place where soft, two-ply tissue with ripples for cleaning one’s backside is a norm. It’s a luxury that until recently I allowed to freely flow off my wall-mounted dispenser.

I have CLEAN water that I can drink straight from the tap without fear of getting sick. Not only can I get water from my sinks, but I also have a couple of show and two outdoor spickets. In addition, I have electricity. There are switches all over the inside of my house that I can turn on any time I want – day or night.

This one deserves a moment of silence…

I have a COFFEE POT. I put a little capsule into this magic machine, push a button and, shazam, a hot cup of liquid energy pours out on demand. I can do this as many times as I want – every day.

Thank the lord for coffee.

I have internet and my son’s teachers are delivering his BCD education right to our kitchen table. His middle school teachers, just like your child’s preschool teachers, are pouring their hearts and souls into making sure that he feels supported while also navigating the challenge of teaching children on giant conference calls.

With my perspectacles on, I see that by connecting on Zoom and checking in via phone and email, his teachers are emphasizing the parts of education that I consider most important:

  • He’s learning to be flexible and adapt to new things.
  • He’s learning to show up for people – even when it’s not easy.
  • He’s learning that his teachers care and are there with him – even at our kitchen table.
  • He’s learning how people at school and in communities around the world can work together and support each other in new and innovative ways.

I hope that you will wear your perspectacles as you consider the heartfelt energy our preschool teachers are putting into supporting your child and family. They are working tirelessly to think of creative ways to bring the magic of our classrooms into your homes.